Are you a Part-Time Writer Looking for Inspiration for 2014? You’ve Come to the ‘Write’ Place!

I’m starting of the year with a guest post from Nikolas Baron, from Grammarly.com. Have you heard of them? It’s a great site for writer’s who need help proofreading their work. From blog posts to essays, they’ve got the tools you need! But first, get inspired to start 2014 off the ‘write’ way!

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The Part-Time Writer

part_time_writerBeing a writer is, for many, a lifelong dream. Writing for payment is a thrilling accomplishment, but it’s usually soon followed by the realization that most writers do not make a living from writing alone. In fact, many writers pursue a separate, unrelated career while writing part-time, whether as a hobby or as a secondary source of income. For the part-time writer facing deadlines, a quality online spelling, grammar, and plagiarism checker can be a valuable tool. Saving time is just one aspect of creating success as a writer, however. Writing takes dedication, patience, and a willingness to learn the craft.

Being a writer is an admirable goal, but it’s not a realistic one. How does one become “a writer”? There is no pill, no bottled potion to be ingested, that will magically bring about the transformation. Becoming a writer begins with picking up a pen; but, having taken that first crucial step, the aspiring writer will discover that the journey has just begun. First, the writer must decide what type of writing he or she wants to do. Fiction or nonfiction? Short stories?

Articles? Novels? Each type of writing requires a unique skill set, and there is a distinct path to follow to the individual definition of success for every writer. It’s important to study the craft and read within and outside the genre to become a well-rounded reader and a better writer. Wanting to be a writer isn’t enough. It’s important to decide upon a genre and a style that best suits the writer’s individual dream. Becoming a writer is a dream. Transforming an abstract desire into a concrete success takes deeper thought.

Once the budding writer has decided upon writing mystery novels, for example, the next step is to set some goals. Novices may want to keep the goals reasonable, setting themselves to the task of writing for a set amount of time per day or obtaining a certain word count, depending on the time that can be found in between other obligations. Some professionals suggest that writing every day is critical to success, while others claim that a certain amount of time must be invested. The truth is somewhere in the middle. Time and discipline are important, but the definition of success is an individual one that only the writers themselves can create. Goals create personal milestones, giving the writer a measuring stick against which to check progress. Setting the goals is entirely up to the writers themselves.

Time can be a precious commodity in our fast-paced world. Between work, family obligations, hobbies, volunteer work, and other commitments, the idea of finding time to write might seem out of reach. However, it can be done. It may be necessary to write out a simple schedule, noting work, family obligations, and other time constraints, and then consider the blocks of time that are not already committed to other pursuits. Television viewing might have to be sacrificed. Getting up a little earlier in the morning, for a morning person, or staying up a little later in the evening, for a night owl, might be an option as well. Moreover, a shorter lunch break might provide some time to indulge the muse.

Time, however, is not always the only consideration. Many writers need to “warm up” to the page, to shift gears from their day jobs into the mental work of writing. It is necessary not only to find time to scribble a few words on a page but also to find long enough blocks of uninterrupted time suitable for writing. Indeed, protecting the quality of one’s writing time is as important as finding time to write in the first place. If writing is not a priority and if the commitment is not as firm as the Saturday-morning golf game or the monthly martini lunch with the girls, it will never get off the ground.Marjorie Facklam, author of numerous children’s books, began writing while raising her five children, with several still in diapers. If a harried mother of five can find time to research and write rhyming science picture books like Bugs for Lunch while chasing toddlers and maintaining a household, any writer can find time in their schedule. Often, the question isn’t one of time, but of commitment.

Connect with  Nikolas Baron on Google+      Plagiarism Checker

nick-Grammerly Guest posterAbout the Author:

Nikolas discovered his love for the written word in Elementary School, where he started spending his afternoons sprawled across the living room floor devouring one Marc Brown childrens’ novel after the other and writing short stories about daring pirate adventures. After acquiring some experience in various marketing, business development, and hiring roles at internet startups in a few different countries, he decided to re-unite his professional life with his childhood passions by joining Grammarly’s marketing team in San Francisco. He has the pleasure of being tasked with talking to writers, bloggers, teachers, and others about how they use Grammarly’s online proofreading application to improve their writing. His free time is spent biking, travelling, and reading.

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Thank you for stopping by! I love to make new friends. Got questions or comments? Leave a comment, or connect with me online!  If you’ve enjoyed this post, sign up for the monthly newsletter and follow this blog!

MJ

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A Fun Way to Learn How to Write From the Male and Female POV and Perspective- Part 1

Before reading any further, take the next three minutes to watch this video. Get your laugh on, then watch it again and get your learn on. Not only will you be entertained, you’re going to learn something new because afterwards, I’m going to break it down!

DATE NIGHT! -THE VIDEO

(Video via Facebook share)

Hilarious, right? It’s the typical men see things differently than women story of a date through the eyes of two very different couples. The difference? The back story. Knowing what each character is going through before, during, and after a scene helps you, the author, know what experiences should be included in a scene and how to present them.

Remember those pesky and time consuming character outlines I’m always referring to? Well, here is how they work for the characters in this short video.

THE BREAK DOWN:

COUPLE A:

HER POV: The Date SUCKED!

Woman A was looking forward to a romantic interlude. She did her hair and make-up, took the time to prepare a meal, and set the table. She expected her date to arrive looking nice, probably bearing a vase of flowers, and taking the time to appreciate her appearance and the meal. Next would have come some small talk, flirting, and no doubt, some personal fun time.

What did she get?

A quick hug, no compliments on her appearance or the meal. Instead he made a beeline for the food, woofed it down without any conversation besides grunts that seemed to ruin her appetite. And when it came to fun time…well, let’s just say Mr. Happy was there and back again in less than 3 seconds, or as she said, before she could unhook the back her dress. And to top it all off, he finds his way to her bed and passes out from what has to be over eating and rapid blood loss to the brain.

His POV: IT was AMAZING!

Man A wanted exactly what he got: A good looking woman who cooked for him (free food), had nothing to say, and stood there long enough for him to get his rocks off. Oh yeah, let’s not forget the comfy bed. In his eyes, major score!! And he got to leave with his needs satisfied in time to watch the big game at home without interruption.

 

COUPLE B:

HER POV: Most ROMANTIC DATE EVER!

Everything about the evening was different than being with any other man. First, he paid for a cab. Dinner was an amazing experience. After, instead of hailing a cab, they took the scenic route, walking along, holding hands, and experiencing the night life from another point of view. At his place, the romance continued with lit candles to set the mood, a very intense love making session that lasted longer than anything she’d ever experienced. And the best part, he didn’t pass out when they were done. They lay there wrapped in each other’s arms and talked all night.

In a nutshell, everything was magical and perfect, just what a girl could ever want.

 His POV: EPIC FAIL!!!!

It’s been a long day full of one frustrating event after another. Failure to pay his light bill lead to to spend money taking her out instead of having her come over. After paying for a cab, dinner was so expensive he could no longer afford a taxi cab home. He plays off the whole broke thing by suggesting they ‘sight see’ and walk to his place, (is this chick gullible or what???). No electricity leaves him improvising again with candles. Frustrated by the series of mind numbing fails, he has too much pride to say let’s call it an evening and tires to play it off by ‘making love’ when what he’s really doing is stalling for time to work himself up for that magic moment. By the end of it all, he doesn’t feel like finishing the act, but he’s literally ‘in the game’ and has to figure out how to play it off, because hey, Ms. Gullible is having the time of her life. Again, frustrated, pissed off, and ready for it all to be over, he can’t sleep which means he has no choice but to be subjected to Ms. Chatty Cathy.

This date sucked so much he probably would refuse to see her ever again.

Pad of Paper & Pen

 

 

 

Now, how does all of this tie into writing?

First, let’s review the definitions of Point of View and Perspective:

 

 

 

 

 

POINT OF VIEW: The position of the narrator in relation to the story, as indicated by the narrator’s outlook from which the events are depicted and by the attitude toward the characters

PERSPECTIVE: the state of one’s ideas, the facts known to one, etc., in having a meaningful interrelationship

(Definitions via dictionary.com)

DETERMINING USE OF POINT OF VIEW:

When telling a story, you must know which character’s voice you want the readers to experience. If the entire story is being written from one character’s POV, then it’s simple. Everything that happens comes from them. If your story is being told from more than one character’s POV, then you must decide how much of is being told and from who’s POV. This can be done in several ways:

  • An entire scene or chapter is told in one character’s POV
  • A scene or chapter is told in split POV’s
  • A section, or portion (meaning more than a few chapters in a row or Part 1, Part 2, etc. of the manuscript) are told from various characters’ POV

Knowing the story your telling (story line) and what your characters experience and how those experiences will affect their decision making (back story) determines who’s POV is shared at certain points. The character’s reactions to their environment and scenarios they face will be based on that back story.

Of the four characters portrayed in the video, the best example would be Man B from the second couple. An unfortunate event (failure to pay his light bill) led to changing his date night plans (paying for cab, expensive dinner, walking home, candle light sex, aggravation to the point of failure to perform for an extended point of time, and sleeplessness). Lack of electricity set off a catalyst of events that when told from his point of view, led to the date from hell. His POV was much more entertaining than Woman B who saw things from a fairytale perspective.

Now, how does perspective come into play?

Come back tomorrow where I’ll break down that portion of the video, as well as share a scene from my bestselling novel, A Heart Not Easily Broken, where I demonstrate the use of perspective from three characters POV in one scene. Until then, Happy Writing!!!

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Thank you for stopping by! I love to make new friends. Got questions or comments? Leave a comment, or connect with me online!  If you’ve enjoyed this post, sign up for the monthly newsletter by following this blog!

MJ

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SORMAG Online Conference 2013- Readers and Writers, will you be there?

On the panel add

Have you heard about the SORMAG Online Conference ?

If not, you have to check it out!

SORMAG (Shades of Romance Magazine) is hosting its annual conference which gives authors the opportunity to learn from one another. Readers, here’s a chance to talk to some of your favorite authors! The event last November 1-3rd!!!

Workshops will be held online as well as by phone.  Each day will have a theme:

November 1st: New Writers

November 2nd: Readers

November 3rd: Published Authors

I’m excited to say that I am not only attending, I’m also on several panels! You will find me on the Social Media and Readers panel on November 2nd, and the Marketing panel on November 3rd. Both are live phone panels, so stop by and say hi!

Follow this link to learn more about the conference topics and what authors will be participating!

Register

Have you ever attended a conference without leaving your home?
Register for SORMAG’s Online Conference for readers and writers. Learn from published authors, network with fellow writers. Pitch your manuscript. Mix and mingle with avid readers. Win a few door prizes and never leave the comforts of your home.

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Thank you for stopping by! I love to make new friends. Got questions or comments? Leave a comment, or connect with me online!  If you’ve enjoyed this post, sign up for the monthly newsletter by following this blog!

MJ

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“I Write Erotic Love Scenes, Not Erotica!” – A Guide to Adding Heat to Your Book

How many times did I want to say that when my first book was published? I know, I know, it’s crazy, but the one thing I wanted my stories to be known for was not how great the love scenes were, but how great of a story was being told. Comments from reviewers have said it was hot, but not so much so that it would make you uncomfortable. Others have considered it tame, while others said they were blushing.

One thing I’ve learned since A Heart Not Easily Broken was published is this: sensuality and the degree of sex in a book is based on the reader.

Unless it’s in the genre of Erotica. The name says it all.

When I started writing, my goal was to avoid putting sex in my book, period. I mean hey, call me prude, but even though I enjoyed reading the elegant prose of a Nora Roberts love scene, I could in no way imagine myself writing it! I mean really, what if my husband picked it up and looked at me with a raised eyebrow, or what if my mom got a hold of it???? What would they think?

MH900440908Then I thought about it some more and realized, hey, I’ve got four kids and they didn’t get here by way of Immaculate Conception nor were they adopted. 🙂  Sex is a part of life and hey, I’m grown! So, I put on a pair of big girl panties, (or thong) and went where the characters want to go!!! To bed!

Now, if your shy or nervous about writing sex scenes, how do you achieve it without being cheesy, unrealistic, or stiff? (I swear no pun was intended in that line!)

Research.

Research can be done in various ways. (Okay, seriously, stop laughing!) Find books from your favorite authors. If there is sex in their stories, study the way it’s written. Is it technical? Do they get creative with words, allowing your imagination to run wild without calling out each position? Or do they write in a way that gets straight to the point? (Insert tab A into slot C = HURRAY!) What about the scene leaves you warm under the collar? Is it a scene you can’t help but read again, or does it bore you to the point of sleep? Make notes of what you would like to see in your books.

**Remember, it’s okay to take a peek into the bedroom without sitting down on the edge of the bed. Leading up to what’s going to happen and stopping, then picking up later is fine, too. Go with what you feel comfortable with! Never push yourself into writing more than you feel comfortable reading for the sake of trying to sell a book. A reader can tell a badly written scene, and like your lovers, the last thing you want a reader to do is laugh (unless of course there is something that happens that is meant to make the reader laugh). Once a lover of romance novels has invested time and grown emotionally connected to your characters and you introduce that ‘moment’ but don’t deliver in some satisfactory way, they may wonder why the characters are together in the first place and quickly lose interest in your novel. (I once had a reader say she liked Brian so much she couldn’t wait to ‘jump in bed’ with him, and once she had, she wasn’t disappointed!)**

Step outside your comfort zone.

If you’ve never read an erotic romance novel, pick one up and peruse the story. I’d never read an Erotic romance story until I read J.R. Ward’s Black Dagger Brotherhood series. Two things I learned from that series:

1)      The men were hot, vulnerable no matter how tough they are, and when they made love, they experienced some deep emotions. Despite what you may think, sex wasn’t just sex.

2)      While the scenes were very well written, there were some terms I would never be comfortable using in describing certain acts or anatomy.

**From the creative prose of Nora Roberts to the front and center of J.R. Ward, two totally different styles, each dealing with the same subject matter. Where would I fit in? What did I want to write? And just how daring did I want to be???? Ask yourself these questions!**

Practice.

(Okay, so I gave up on avoiding puns when I started talking about research. 🙂 )

Once you’ve decided the lingo you want to use in your scene, you have to write it! Trust me, writing sex is not as easy as you’d like to think it is! It gets very technical. Just like writing description in a scene or what your character is experiencing on a day to day bases, it’s even more intense when dealing with the ‘moment’ that can either push your character forward in a new relationship, or throw a new obstacle in their path, depending on where the story is going. I once read a blog that said writing sex is like writing an action scene. In order for the reader to know what’s going on – who punched who, and what the punch felt like or where it landed – you have to map out the action, movement-by-movement. Okay, the couple isn’t fighting in the bedroom, but they are moving together in a sort of dance. It has to be described so the reader not only ‘sees’ it in their mind, they ‘feel’ it, as well. To achieve this, the five senses must be visited.

*Touch– the feel of their lover’s hands on their body, or the way their lover feels to them. Rough hands, soft hands, a slow caress, a grip of passion.

*Taste– the taste of wine recently consumed during a kiss.

*Sight– excitement from the exposure of naked flesh.

*Sound- music in the background, a gasp, satisfied sigh.

*Smell– candles, perfume, sweat; you see where I’m going, right?

**When in doubt of how a good scene should progress, watch a few movies. Notice how the kisses can start out slow as the camera pans down to what the actors bodies are doing? Where are the hands? How do their bodies touch? What is the response of the other party? Visualize your characters as if they are in a movie and write what you see. Sometimes its slow, sometimes it’s fueled by passion and rough. It’s all in where your characters head is at.**

M.J.’s Tips:

* Don’t be afraid to write what you feel. That’s what editing is for! If your scene comes across as pornographic the first time around, don’t worry! Get it on paper, then tame it down. Take out what you feel is too much for your genre or what you feel comfortable with writing. Get a friend to read it and have them tell you what they think. Listen to the feedback, then make the changes. Trust me, editing love scenes can be the hardest part of editing! It can take me a week to edit a love scene versus the time it takes to edit any other chapter!

* Avoid the technical terms found in your old high school biology book. Talk about a mood killer! Pick up that Thesaurus, get creative, and find something you think works best.

* Make sure it makes sense!!! In real life, you don’t start standing up, then end up on the bed without transitioning to that location. Remember to add movement! In a regular scene, your character isn’t chilling on the sofa, then the next minute he’s answering the door without there being a reason why he got up from the sofa to go to the door. The same applies to love scenes!

* Dialogue during the act itself can be good, but let’s be realistic; nobody wants to read a full conversation during the act. A command, a request, a moaned response, sure, but who wants to hear about the other characters day? Leave that for pillow talk!

* Character thoughts…Okay, I am not ashamed to admit, this is where my scenes start carrying the ‘erotica’ tag. My stories are written in 1st person which means you’re already deep inside their world. You know what makes them tick, why they act the way they do, and how they truly feel without being told about it in the traditional 3rd person point of view. So, when they are with the one they love or want, you’re going to know exactly how that kiss feels, how they react physically to their lovers touch, and so on and so forth. The only difference, I don’t start shouting out anatomy in a vulgar or textbook fashion.

* Never feel you have to have an unlimited amount of sex in your book! Make each scene count! I normally have three scenes in my stories, not counting encounters that are alluded to. For me, each encounter is an opportunity for the characters relationship to grow and add more to the story and not be a page filler.

So, how has my family responded since I published my books?

My husband says I write very well, and my mom…well, she read a Sunday Sample where the character mentions his…um…physical reaction to seeing the heroine for the first time. She called me and said, ‘What do you mean he was happy he was standing behind the counter?’ Since then, she has gotten copies of both of my books and I have told her once she reads them not to call. LOL!!! And I’m pretty sure she’s going to read this post and leave a comment. I love you, Mom!

Good luck with your writing, and remember, if you can’t feel comfortable writing it, don’t. Go with what you feel works best for you! And don’t worry, sometimes it is good to shut the door on the reader, just as long as you make it known the character is happy on the other side!

And of course, I can’t talk about writing a sex scene without sharing one of my own. Here’s a little sample of what goes on behind closed doors in A Heart Not Easily Broken:

Excerpt:

I slipped my fingers between us and quickly unfastened the buttons of his shirt. Of all days to decide to wear one of these. Why couldn’t he have on a pullover like always? A quick tug would have had his chest available to me in seconds. Now I had to work for it.

Buttons free, I forced the material over his shoulders and down to his wrists. He released me to help remove the shirt. In our haste, his wrists got tangled up. I bit my lip as I looked down at him. His eyes were the most intense shade of blue I’d ever seen. His mouth parted expectantly. His lips were swollen and pink from the way I’d sucked them. I wanted to own him. Every…last…inch.

A deep chuckle came from his throat. “What are you doing?” He tried to free his wrist.

“Don’t worry, I promise you’ll like it.” I smiled wickedly as I fisted the makeshift handcuffs, trapping his hands on the bed.

I nibbled, lapped, and sucked my way to his throat while Brian groaned.

He smelled so good, so male. Barbeque and beer mixed with his musky cologne that held a hint of sweetness. His scent had driven me crazy all night. I took my time to savor every detail of his bronzed flesh, tasting every inch I could reach. But it wasn’t enough. I lifted my head from his chest and teased him with my tongue, evading his mouth as he tried to capture mine.

He panted beneath me, his chest heaved in and out, but his eyes, those crystal blue orbs stayed on me. I was driving him crazy, and my time to be in control was running out. I was sure the moment his wrist were free, he would take me down and return the favor.

Perfect, because that was exactly what I wanted.

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Click here for more information about  my Bestselling novel, A Heart Not Easily Broken. 

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Thank you for stopping by! I love to make new friends. Got questions or comments? Leave a comment, or connect with me online!  If you’ve enjoyed this post, sign up for the monthly newsletter by following this blog!

MJ

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All Telling and No Showing Do NOT Make a Good Tale!

“Show what your character is doing, don’t tell!”

Sigh…as a new writer, those words coming from your critique partners, beta readers, or even worse, your editor can be enough to drive you insane. As if deciding to write in the first place wasn’t insane enough! Nevertheless…no matter what genre you write, it’s true.

Having a problem understanding the difference between “Showing” vs. “Telling”? Let me see if I can explain it without anyone blowing a much needed brain cell.

Telling is basically taking a scene, and giving an overwhelming amount of information, such as too much back story (yes, if not written correctly, it can be overkill), or the lack of stimulating visual clues that force your reader to ‘see’ the scene or back drop of what the character is experiencing.

Showing is the opposite. Instead of telling a character’s back story that leads up to a scene, that same information is given by way of dialogue. Another way would be instead of giving clinical descriptions about a location (there were large trees, or it was cold), describe it through the eyes of the character as they see it. What did it look like? (colors and textures) How did it feel (cold, hot, uncomfortable). Using the character’s words (and the handy dandy thesaurus!), it will be much easier to make the change.

Let me give an example. This is from my original manuscript sent to my critique partners. This is a snippet from chapter five. In this version, you see the description I used (it’s been crossed out because it was telling) and replaced by her suggestion which is showing.

Her delicate hand felt soft against my callused palm. Her curvaceous body, the inspiration of last night’s erotic dream, pressed against me. God help me, it was impossible to ignore the softness of her breasts when they brushed across my chest.
  
I struggled to slow my breathing,

[C1] 

I drew in a deep breath and held it for a few second in an effort not wanting her to know how much she was turned me on.
Ebony’s warm body against mine was the most exquisite form of torture.

 [C1]How? (This was the comment made by my Critique partner, indicating the need to ‘show’ what Brian meant, instead of ‘telling’ what he did) 
This how it works. My line was:

I struggled to slow my breathing, not wanting her to know how much she turned me on. 
Okay, so you got a general idea of what he meant. However, it left the reader wanting to know more. Questions such as Why or How were not necessarily answered. What would slowing his breathing mean? How would it change anything else that could be going on inside of him?
My critique partner left a suggested change that I took and ran with once I understood what she meant. 
Here is the result of the final edit: 
Her hand felt soft and delicate in mine. Her curvaceous body, the inspiration for last night’s erotic dream, pressed against me. God help me, it was impossible to ignore the softness of her breasts when she brushed against my chest.
I drew in a deep breath and held it for a few seconds in an effort to control the increased beating of my heart. I didn’t want her to know how much she turned me on.
Ebony’s warm body against mine was the most exquisite form of torture.

See the difference?

Now the reader will get the full sense of Brian’s physical reaction to holding Ebony in his arms for the first time. His heart was racing with from the excitement of feeling her body pressed against him, that first contact. He made a conscious effort to slow his breathing so he wouldn’t start hyperventilating and have Ebony think something was wrong with him. He wanted to remain cool, calm, and confident, things that he’d addressed earlier in the dialogue between them. If I had spent time writing the scene with those words, there would have been no oomph to the story. It would have all been telling what was going on instead of showing how he felt.

Here’s another example, one off the top of my head that is not in my novel.

Let’s say your character is angry, so angry that he snaps in a moment of rage and punches the wall. As a result, he’s broken his hand. There are two ways to tell this.

Telling: 

“What?” he said, anger in his voice.

 Phillip walked around the room knocking every available object off the table. When his path was blocked by the wall, he stopped. Unable to calm down, he reared back as far as possible and throws his fist into the wall. When he pulled back, his knuckled fist was bleeding. He’d broken his hand.

So, here, all of Phillips actions are told to the reader. There’s no need for the reader to visualize what’s happening because it’s like watching a movie. The action is all there. Now, let’s try this in a different way.

Showing:

“What?” Phillip jumped from the chair where he’d been reclining after a long day of tiring work.

 His breath pumped, his fists open and closed as rage filled his very being. Unable to contain his outburst, he searched for any available outlet. The planter, the clock, not even the innocent bottle of water was spared. Within seconds, the floor was littered with debris. His ranting path was cut short by the boundaries of the living room. Without thought, Phillip zeroed in on his new target…then immediately regretted his mindless decision. Blood now stained the wall and pain radiated up us arm. Unable to move his fingers, it was time to seek medical attention. 

Whew! A lot more words went into showing a characters action than just telling. 

Still having a hard time trying to determine how to show and not tell? 

This is what I do. When writing a scene that requires the characters actions to reflect emotion, or a lot of action, the first thing I do is write it as a telling scene. I imagine the list of actions he/she will take to get from point A to point B. Then, I read it through, allowing myself to ‘see’ and ‘feel’ their reaction. How does it affect me emotionally, physically? Is my heart racing? Do I feel my fist balling up? Is it harder to breath? Then I write exactly what I feel, as I feel it. I don’t think of all the technical descriptions and go with the emotional ones. The result is what I got in the showing example. (*This technique works wonderfully when writing love scenes, too!) 

Showing action is much more interesting than telling what is going one. Keeping your readers stuck on paragraph after paragraph of telling will bore them to the point of going to sleep. Without the action in showing to stimulate reader’s imagination, they are in no rush to come back the next day to read more. Let’s face it, captivating the reader’s attention will not only have them read your entire novel, it will have them salivating for your next available work.

Isn’t that what we ALL want? 

In a nutshell, the difference between telling and showing is all in the way you say it. Don’t waste time giving long-winded speeches as to why a character is motivated to take action, let them tell it in dialogue when possible. If done while the character is musing…keep it short and sweet, pepper it in the manuscript when necessary. Don’t overdue.

Also, when showing, don’t be afraid to be descriptive, use that thesaurus, and attach it to the top of your head if you have too. The point is, be creative, don’t fall into the habit of using passive words or phrases. Those will slow down your prose and take an action scene into a slow-mo scene that causes your readers to yawn. So will repeating the same tired phrases…such as like, and….oh good grief, that’s a whole new blog. I’ll tackle that one another time. 

Until then, I hope you found this information useful! Feel free to drop a line below. As always I love to hear your thoughts, comments, and who doesn’t like a good follow every now and then? 

Happy Writing! 


MJ

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